Trees Along My Journey

Canada to Baja California, Mexico

We shall never see, a thing more lovely than a tree.


L earning about trees is hard. I bought a book published by the Audobon Society. This book did not describe most of the trees that I saw. So, I decided to collect my own trees.

This page on trees, is only beginning. My plan is to have an image of the tree, the trunk and a closeup of needles or leaves on a branch end.. Text showing when and where the image was collected will be included. Of course the trees will at some time be identified. That is my goal.




Quaking Aspen

We captured this lovely tree near the Ochoco Forest in Oregon, and are thankful to a reader of our Blog named Thomas for identification. The Aspen's leaves shimmer in the Sun, giving the name "Quaking" to this lovely tree.

Quaking Aspen




Douglas Fir

This very beautiful tree is abundant in Oregon. The Douglas Fir looks a great deal like the Grand Fir, below. At first we confused these two trees. Then we found Douglas Fir growing right next to Grand Fir, and saw that the needles were very different.

Trunk of mature Douglas Fir.


Young Douglas Fir.


Trunk of young Douglas Fir.




Grand Fir

We captured this tree in the Ochoco National Forest, May 27, 2005. The needles grow singly, wide and flat. When looking at the needles from the end of a twig, they appear flat. The needles grow from opposite sides of the twig. The upper side of the needles is a deep green, and the lower side a bluish green.

Grand Fir




Juniper

This Juniper was captured on May 27, 2005, along the banks of the John Day River near Spray, Oregon. Juniper is the most abundant tree in this area. Rubbing the needles between my fingers, produces a distinctive fragrance. Growing from the needles, are what appear to be bluish berries.

Juniper




Juniper-High Desert

This Juniper was captured on May 17, 2006, at the Islands in the Sky section of Canyonlands National Park. The tree was growing at the 6,000 foot elevation near Willow Flat campground in the State of Utah. The shape of this Juniper is different than the Juniper above, as you may see.

Often when these Junipers die, they remain for many, many years as shown in the bottom image below.

Juniper - High Desert




Ponderosa Pine

While camping in Oregon's Umatilla National Forest on May 28, 2005, I captured this Ponderosa. Many Ponderosas have the distinctive reddish bark as on this tree. Many however, have bark with much less contrast. The needles grow in bundles of 3, and are about 6" long. Online descriptions of the Ponderosa state that sometimes needles grow in bundles of 2. I have not seen any bundles of 2. The altitude here is 4,050 feet.

Ponderosa Pine




Pacific Silver Fir

We found these Pacific Silver Fir trees in the Klackitat County Courthouse Park in Goldendale, Washington on May 30, 2005.

Pacific Silver Fir




Blue Spruce

This lovely little Blue Spruce was captured from the frontyard of a home in Goldenvale, Washington on May 31, 2005. This lovely blue-grey color and shape of the needles is exceptional!

Blue Spruce




Subalpine Fir

On June 5th, 2005 at the Red Top Campground in the Wenatchee National Forest, I captured my Subalpine Fir. The needles of this fir are very coarse in appearance, and grow all around the branch rather than in rows.

Subalpine Fir




Western Red Cedar

In the Okanogan National Forest on June 12, 2005 at the 2,390 foot level, I captured my first Cedar Tree. A fellow who lives close by this tree, came by and identifed it as a Western Red Cedar. I am searching for a free standing Red Cedar, but so far all of them are all growing close together.

Western Red Cedar




Western Larch

This Western Larch was captured at the 6,800 foot level on Mount Baker, Washington close to the southern end of the Pasayten Wilderness. For awhile, I thought that this tree was a Tamarack because the needles grow in bunches.


Western Larch




Tamarack

This Tamarack was captured in the Town of Newhalem, Washington across from the General Store. This little tree is domestic, not wild. For awhile, I confused this Tamarack with the Western Larch above.

Tamarack #1




Unknown Tree

We saw a bunch of these trees, as we were leaving the Okanogan National Forest on June 16, 2005. We captured tree at about the 4,500 foot level, west of Mazama, Washington. We would like this tree to be an Oregon Ash, but it isn't. It might be a Pacific Willow, but it was growing on a mountain, away from any water.


Tamarack #2




Western Hemlock

We captured this Western Hemlock in the Snoqualmie National Forest at the East Creek Trailhead on June 17, 2005 at the 2300 foot altitude. This area has tons of different trees. Cedar, spruce, fir, pine and of course, this Western Hemlock. The cones are about 3/4" in length. The needles are about 3/8" long, a deep green color on top and lighter green on the bottom and have rounded tips. The needles are staggered along the twig.


Western Hemlock




Boxelder

This tree was captured in Zion National Park, on the trail to Weeping Rock. That was on April 26, 2006. Zion is an oasis in the middle of a Utah desert. There are many different trees growing here.

A member of the maple family, boxelder is probably familiar to many people. It grows wild in most states.

Boxelder




Pinyon Tree

This Pinyon Tree was captured on May 17, 2006, at the Islands in the Sky section of Canyonlands National Park. The tree was growing at the 6,000 foot elevation near Willow Flat campground in the State of Utah.

Pinyon Tree




Bristlecone Pine

This Bristlecone Pine was captured on May 26, 2007, on the Alpine Pond Trail in Cedar Breaks National Monument in the State of Utah. The tree was growing at the 10,400 foot elevation.

Bristlecone Pine







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